Reverse Sear Pork Chops - Butter Together Kitchen

Reverse Sear Garlic Pork Chops

Pork chops are a classic, but we’ve created a new way to cook up an old favorite. These are the juiciest, most tender pork chops you’ll ever eat!

Jump to Recipe Print Recipe

top view of garlic pork chops in a skillet pan


 

Growing up, I didn’t care much for pork chops. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed them, but they were never really a favorite. I’ll put it this way: I never begged my mom to make pork chops for dinner. But recently, a whole new world has opened up to me – a world where pork chops are delicious!

The Seasoning

I’ve always heard that the seasonings make the dish, and I think that is true. You can make an old boot appetizing if you season it properly. Okay, maybe not quite, but you get the idea. The same is true when it comes to pork chops. For this recipe, we didn’t use anything unusual for seasoning. We used salt, pepper, garlic powder, and onion powder (basically, the classics). In addition to the seasonings, we drizzled these pork chops with some olive oil and threw in a handful of uncapped garlic cloves. It made all the difference!


Baking Them

It seems like the standard way to make pork chops is in the oven. That is also the case here, at least to begin. We baked these in a medium sized dish at 350 degrees for about 40 minutes (cook time depends on thickness). This allowed some of the natural fats to melt and the chops were able to marinate in their own juices. Naturally, the result is juicy, flavorful, and tender pork chops!

seasoned pork chops getting ready to go into oven

Searing Them

It seems that searing pork chops is not a common practice, and to be honest, that makes me a little sad. When you sear a pork chop, just like when you sear a steak, you end up with a crispy, flavorful crust. Trust me, it makes all the difference. We seared these pork chops in the hottest cast iron skillet we could find for about 60 seconds on each side. Then, once both sides were seared, we took the skillet off the heat and poured in the juices that were left behind in the dish we originally baked them in. Then we let them simmer for about 60 seconds. In some ways, this almost defeats the point of the sear. I’ll admit, some of the crunchiness of the sear is lost when you pour the juices in. However, trust me when I say that it is totally worth it!

close up side view of pork chops in a skillet pan

The juices penetrate the chop, but the top of the cuts (the part that is untouched by the juices) remain dry and crispy. It really is the perfect combination!

 garlic seasoned pork chops long pin for Pinterest

Have you tried this recipe or any other recipe on the blog? Then please rate it below and let us know what you think in the comments! We love hearing from you!

You can also share it on instagram and use the hashtag #buttertogetherkitchen and we will feature you on our page.

Enjoy!

 P.S This was is also perfect with steak! Check out our Reverse Sear Steak!
Print

Reverse Sear Garlic Pork Chops


  • Author: Dylan
  • Prep Time: 5 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 Minutes
  • Total Time: 50 Minutes
  • Yield: 1 lb Pork Chops
  • Category: Main Dish

Description

Pork chops are a classic, but we’ve created a new way to cook up an old favorite. These are the juiciest, most tender pork chops you’ll ever eat!


Ingredients

  • 1 lb Pork Chops
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp Garlic Powder
  • 1 tsp Onion Powder
  • 2 Tbs Olive Oil
  • 5  Cloves Unchopped Garlic

Instructions

  1. Place pork chops in baking dish and top with salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, and drizzle with olive oil.
  2. Bake at 350 F for approximately 40 minutes, or until internal temperature is 145 F.
  3. Remove from dish and place in hot cast iron skillet – sear each side for approximately 60 seconds.
  4. If desired, pour in leftover juices in the baking dish and let simmer off heat for approximately 60 seconds.

Notes

  • This recipe assumes you will be making about a pound of pork chops that are approximately 1 inch thick.
  • When searing, you will want your cast iron skillet to pretty much be as hot as it will get.

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Please follow and like us:


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *